Tag Archive: Industrial

The relationship between teachers’ self-efficacy with behavior management and school-wide positive behavior supports (Education Papers posted on April 11th, 2014 )

Classroom management is a common concern for educators. Teachers with high self-efficacy are strongly linked with having successful characteristics regarding their classroom management styles and strategies. With this in mind, the current study examined classroom teachers’ perceived self-efficacy, specifically regarding their behavior management strategies, before and after the implementation of school-wide positive behavior supports. Using a multilevel modeling analysis, data collected through the use of self-efficacy surveys from 48 teachers at the secondary level and 15 teachers at the elementary level were examined at the individual and school level. Results indicated that there was an overall increase of self-efficacy in regards to teachers’ classroom behavior management strategies. In addition, an interaction effect implied that teachers at the secondary level, with more years of experience, indicated that their self-efficacy lowered, whereas elementary teachers experienced an increase of self-efficacy as a function of the intervention. Implications of these findings and future directions are discussed.

Crisis in the schools: Crisis, crisis intervention training, and school counselor burnout (Education Papers posted on March 25th, 2013 )

In the course of a school year, schools may face a number of crisis situations, including suicidality, child abuse and neglect, violence, and natural disasters that may impact individual students or create school-wide crises Collins & Collins, 2005; Mathai, 2002). Each of these crises can pose a threat to student and school safety and, therefore, requires swift and precise action. In addition to the potential lethality of these situations, they also can take an emotional toll on school personnel, potentially leading to increased levels of burnout Collins & Collins). Despite the prevalence of crisis situations in schools, there is a dearth of literature referencing school crisis intervention. To date, researchers have not considered important issues such as training in crisis intervention, adequacy of preparation, and self-perceived skills that are necessary to provide crisis intervention in the schools. Because schools serve as the primary provider of child and adolescent mental Health services Burns et al. 1995; Hoagwood & Erwin, 1997), limited training in crisis intervention may leave the professional school counselor less than adequately prepared for the crises they encounter in their schools Allen et al., 2002). The current study examined the impact of crisis related issues type, frequency, and training) on school counselor burnout in order to describe any potential links between level and perceived adequacy of training, perception of crisis intervention efficacy, frequency of crises encountered, self-perceived crisis intervention skills, and level of burnout experienced. Specifically, results indicated that school counselors worked with a variety of individual crisis situations multiple times during the previous year, but may have gaps in their training experiences regarding crisis topics. On average, participants found crisis training helpful, and some types of crisis training were negatively correlated with levels of burnout. Findings of this study may inform further research on the potential relationships between crisis training, crisis frequency, and school counselor burnout. Counselor educators and school counselors may use these findings to explore ways to best prepare school counselors for crisis intervention. This exploration may ultimately help current and future school counselors both provide effective crisis intervention and prevent their own burnout.

The relationship length of service, salary, and supervision has on the job satisfaction of teachers in Upstate South Carolina (Education Papers posted on March 23rd, 2013 )

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship length of service, salary, and supervision has on the job satisfaction of teachers in Upstate South Carolina. Hypothesis One provided no significant support for teacher length of service and the six satisfaction scores. Teacher length of service was not positively correlated with job satisfaction. None of the six related correlations provided support for hypothesis two which predicted teacher salary would be negatively correlated with job satisfaction. Hypothesis three was confirmed. Supervision was positively correlated with teacher job satisfaction. The study predicted other findings that were significant. Overall, the study provided a significant difference in length of service, salary, and supervision as they impact job satisfaction. Implications of this study for teachers, administrators and human resource professionals in schools are discussed.

An examination of the effects of small groups on employee job satisfaction: An I/O review of educational strategies (Education Papers posted on March 21st, 2013 )

This study examines the potential impact of small learning centers within school districts on employee satisfaction. A mixed-method strategy is being used to determine if smaller groups can assist administrators to maintain a more stable, content, and satisfied staff, while potentially impacting turnover and attrition rates.

An investigation into environmental policy: The discourse of environmental management and its effect on educational practice at the Saskatchewan Power Corporation (Education Papers posted on March 21st, 2013 )

This study provides a genealogical analysis of how a managerial framework affects or implicates educational practice at the Saskatchewan Power Corporation SaskPower). The purpose is to investigate the underlying beliefs and assumptions associated with the concept of environmental responsibility as set within a managerial framework, particularly as this implicates the corporations approach to public environmental education. Michel Foucaults archaeology is applied in a broad sense to an understanding of the beliefs and assumptions shared among decision-makers in managing the environmental issues associated with the generation and delivery of electricity. The investigation is based principally on the transcript text produced through interviews with decision-makers at SaskPower, as well as others with an interest in the environment and environmental education from non-governmental organizations, governmental agencies and the University of Regina. Emerging from the transcript text of those interviewed at SaskPower is a discourse of environmental management, characterized by a shared understanding of the need for individual people to take action on behalf of the environment, whether as employees or as consumers of electricity. This discourse is also characterized by an unquestioned faith in new technologies and management practices to minimize the environmental impacts associated with electrical generation. Among those interviewed at SaskPower, IT was indicated that a public educational program is needed to inform people about the environmental, cost and reliability concerns associated with a short list of energy options for the future supply of electricity in Saskatchewan. This approach to education is characterized in particular by a utilitarian decision-making process that considers potential energy options, with relatively little emphasis on questions about energy consumption and conservation. Among those interviewed from non-governmental organizations, governmental agencies and the University of Regina, however, a critical environmental discourse was identified with a focus on the need for SaskPower to take a more serious approach to energy conservation. Further, an alternative discourse was identified with an emphasis on preserving the land itself in contrast to a discourse based on its economic potential. In this investigation, a future research path is considered then that would explore a more collaborative and inclusive approach to public environmental education.

An investigation into environmental policy: The discourse of environmental management and its effect on educational practice at the Saskatchewan Power Corporation (Education Papers posted on March 20th, 2013 )

This study provides a genealogical analysis of how a managerial framework affects or implicates educational practice at the Saskatchewan Power Corporation SaskPower). The purpose is to investigate the underlying beliefs and assumptions associated with the concept of environmental responsibility as set within a managerial framework, particularly as this implicates the corporations approach to public environmental education. Michel Foucaults archaeology is applied in a broad sense to an understanding of the beliefs and assumptions shared among decision-makers in managing the environmental issues associated with the generation and delivery of electricity. The investigation is based principally on the transcript text produced through interviews with decision-makers at SaskPower, as well as others with an interest in the environment and environmental education from non-governmental organizations, governmental agencies and the University of Regina. Emerging from the transcript text of those interviewed at SaskPower is a discourse of environmental management, characterized by a shared understanding of the need for individual people to take action on behalf of the environment, whether as employees or as consumers of electricity. This discourse is also characterized by an unquestioned faith in new technologies and management practices to minimize the environmental impacts associated with electrical generation. Among those interviewed at SaskPower, IT was indicated that a public educational program is needed to inform people about the environmental, cost and reliability concerns associated with a short list of energy options for the future supply of electricity in Saskatchewan. This approach to education is characterized in particular by a utilitarian decision-making process that considers potential energy options, with relatively little emphasis on questions about energy consumption and conservation. Among those interviewed from non-governmental organizations, governmental agencies and the University of Regina, however, a critical environmental discourse was identified with a focus on the need for SaskPower to take a more serious approach to energy conservation. Further, an alternative discourse was identified with an emphasis on preserving the land itself in contrast to a discourse based on its economic potential. In this investigation, a future research path is considered then that would explore a more collaborative and inclusive approach to public environmental education.

An examination of the effects of small groups on employee job satisfaction: An I/O review of educational strategies (Education Papers posted on March 19th, 2013 )

This study examines the potential impact of small learning centers within school districts on employee satisfaction. A mixed-method strategy is being used to determine if smaller groups can assist administrators to maintain a more stable, content, and satisfied staff, while potentially impacting turnover and attrition rates.

Client, counselor, and work setting differences in eating disorder counselor’s burnout and career sustaining behaviors (Education Papers posted on March 14th, 2013 )

The purpose of this study is to determine if burnout occurs among counselors who work with eating disordered patients. This study examined client, counselor, and work related variables to determine if these factors influence burnout and career sustaining behaviors. This study sought to answer the following questions: 1) Do eating disorder therapists suffer from burnout?, 2) Is there a relationship between burnout levels and the use of career sustaining behaviors? Which career sustaining behaviors be used to predict burnout?, 3) Is there a relationship between burnout levels and use of career sustaining behaviors due to client characteristics? Which client characteristics predict burnout levels and the use of career sustaining behaviors?, 4) Is there a relationship between burnout levels and the use of career sustaining behaviors due to work setting differences? Which work setting characteristics can be used to predict burnout and the use of career sustaining behaviors?, and 5) Is there a relationship between burnout levels and use of career sustaining behaviors due to counselor characteristics? What counselor characteristics can be used to predict burnout and career sustaining behaviors? Sixty four usable surveys were received for a return rate of 18.29%. Each subject completed a background questionnaire, the Psychologist Burnout Inventory PBI), the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey MBI-HSS), and the Career Sustaining Behaviors Questionnaire CSB-Q). All data was entered in SPSS 11.0 student version for analysis. Mean scores for the three subscales of the MBI-HSS and the CSB-Q were entered into Pearson bivariate correlations with client, counselor and work setting variables. Any variables with a significant correlational relationship to the three subscales scores or CSB-Q score were then entered into multiple regression analysis to determine which variables were significant predictors. A correlational relationship was noted between some variables with burnout and career sustaining behaviors. Few were able to predict burnout or career sustaining behaviors. Future research should expand upon the variables used in this study.

The effect of two intervention techniques on the level of burnout among children service workers (Education Papers posted on March 12th, 2013 )

The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two intervention techniques on the level of burnout among Children Service Workers. A total of 28 individuals voluntarily agreed to participate in the study. These members were randomly assigned to three groups, Person Centered Theory, Cognitive Behavioral Theory and a control group. The Person Centered and Cognitive Behavioral groups received information and intervention techniques, specific to each theory, over a six week period. The control group received no treatment. At the conclusion of the six weeks of intervention treatment, all three groups were post-tested using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey. Analyses were conducted on the post-tests of the dependent variables and covariates using among group multivariate analysis of covariance MANCOVA). No differences in level of burnout among the groups were found based on receiving Person Centered, Cognitive Behavioral or no intervention. Limitations of this study were greatly influenced by small sample size and limited treatment periods.

Which foreign firms do more to train African workers and why? Evidence from enterprise surveys (Education Papers posted on March 8th, 2013 )

Africa’s lack of economic development is closely related to its paucity of human capital, defined broadly as the unique abilities and skills of individuals. Traditional education and government-led training, while effective in certain settings, are not the only means to develop human capital. This study investigates the training of workers by foreign private firms in Africa to better understand which firms carry out such training and why. Using a unique survey by UNIDO, IT measures the extent to which enterprise-based training by 1,216 foreign firms operating in 15 sub-Saharan African countries is correlated with other characteristics of those firms and the host country. I find that the level of human capital in the host country, industrial sector, investor’s region of origin, as well as the importance of government-provided services are statistically significant and positively associated with firm training. Based on these findings, I suggest a more proactive role for Investment Promotion Agencies in courting firms from certain sectors and regions, greater government involvement in influencing firms to train, and an expanded focus on the role of education as a foundation for firm training.